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Cary Grant’s Gray Suit in To Catch a Thief

BAMF Style

Cary Grant as John Robie in To Catch a Thief (1955). Cary Grant as John Robie in To Catch a Thief (1955).

Vitals

Cary Grant as John Robie, retired cat burglar and jewel thief

French Riviera, Summer 1954

Background

To Catch a Thief is a classic Hitchcock production featuring two of his favorite stars – Cary Grant and Grace Kelly – in a romantic crime comedy-thriller set against the exotic backdrop of the French Riviera. It was one of Grace’s last films in her too-brief five-year acting career before becoming Princess of Monaco.

Grant and Kelly’s undeniable chemistry is still remarkable sixty years later. While legendary Hollywood costumer Edith Head dressed Princess Grace for the film, it’s believed that Grant provided most of his own attire as he was, after all, Cary fucking Grant.

After looking very sharp in a midnight blue dinner suit, Grant continued to impress by donning a debonair gray suit for both an office visit and a funeral. While it’s a

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They Don’t Make Them Like That Anymore

Benjamin Wild

This article was originally posted with Parisian Gentleman.

 

The Style & Symbolism of Fred Astaire, Gary Cooper & Cary Grant

Man’s stock appears to be falling. He is suffering a public relations crisis.

Three years ago, Hanna Rosin cogently contemplated ‘The End of Man’, as his physical size and strength are of little consequence in our post-industrial society.[i] Four months ago, Washington Post columnist Richard Cohen baulked at the ‘new sex appeal’ promoted by James Bond’s twenty-third cinematic outing, which preferences Man’s pectorals and glutes over his personality and gumption.[ii] The debate about Man’s societal role and public presentation gives a new twist to age-old discussions about ‘great men’ and icons, particularly from the golden years of Hollywood. Cohen suggests that Man’s present focus on physical perfection has emasculated him. To make the point, he compares Daniel Craig’s Bond with Cary Grant’s Roger O. Thornhill in Hitchcock’s…

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North by Northwest

Let’s revisit BAMFs look at CGs suit to go along with the sunglasses mystery…Fantastic post….

BAMF Style

Vitals

Cary Grant as Roger O. Thornhill, Madison Avenue ad man mistaken for an international spy

New York City, Fall 1958

Film: North by Northwest
Release Date: July 28, 1959
Director: Alfred Hitchcock
Tailor: Arthur Lyons of Kilgour, French & Stanbury
Wardrobe Department: Harry Kress

Background

North by Northwest is famous for being one of the best thrillers and espionage films of all time, but it has also received plenty of accolades as the greatest “suit movie” due to the sharply-tailored gray-blue Glen plaid suit that Cary Grant wears throughout the film. In August 2015, Esquire gave it the top spot on its Greatest Suits in Film list… which also included several other heroes you’ll see on the pages of BAMF Style.

The suit even inspired a short story from writer Todd McEwen, retelling North by Northwest from the perspective of Grant’s tailored suit and shining a light on just…

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Cary Grant’s Sunglasses

RVelo

Apparently Bob Dylan’s famous Wayfarer-style sunglasses aren’t the only ones people are interested in ID-ing.  Slate.com’s article The Coolest Sunglasses Mystery puts out a call for any information people might have on the make/model of the sunglasses Cary Grant wore in Alfred Hitchcock’s movie “North by Northwest.”

CaryGrantSunglassesYou can see my earlier 3-part post related to Dylan’s sunglasses at the links below (sorry folks, the actual make/model still haven’t been conclusively determined):

Bob Dylan’s Sunglasses

Bob Dylan’s Sunglasses, Part II

Bob Dylan’s Sunglasses, Part III

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